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Michael Jackson sexual abuse documentary “Leaving Neverland”

MICHAEL Jackson’s private life is set to be investigated in a controversial new documentary called Leaving Neverland.

What is Leaving Neverland about?

The two-part film, made by British filmmaker Dan Reed, contains interviews with two men who claim they were abused by Jackson when they were children.

The documentary details claims from Wade Robson, a choreographer who says Jackson began abusing him when he was 7, and James Safechuck, a former child actor who says the singer began molesting him when he was 10.

Leaving Neverland left audience members shocked with graphic abuse claims including how he allegedly gave a young boy jewellery in exchange for sex acts.

Amy Kaufman, LA Times Hollywood writer, said: “Incredibly emotional reaction from the audience after #LeavingNeverland.”

One audience member says he was molested as a child and that Robson and Safechuck “are going to do a lot more f***ing good in the world than Michael f***ing Jackson.”

What has Michael Jackson’s family said about the documentary?

Representatives for Jackson’s estate issued a statement condemning the documentary.

Speaking to the website TMZ, representatives from the estate said the film was “another lurid production in an outrageous and pathetic attempt to exploit and cash in on Michael Jackson … just another rehash of dated and discredited allegations. It’s baffling why any credible film-maker would involve himself with this project”.

Jackson’s Estate has slammed as “disgraceful” the contentious Leaving Neverland documentary that claims he molested boys.

The estate’s lawyer has sent a 10-page letter to HBO boss Richard Plepler, criticising the two-part film as “one-sided and a disgrace”.

The controversial documentary features fresh abuse claims by former childhood fans of the Thriller singer. These include accusers Wade Robson and James Safechuck, who said they suffered abuse in Jacko’s enormous California mansion he dubbed Neverland. By Joanne Kavanagh, The Sun